Jenny Kokai on her play THE ART OF FLOATING

Jennifer A. Kokai is a member of The Lab at Plan-B and teaches at Weber State University. Jenny’s play THE ART OF FLOATING is the next offering of our 2016/17 Script-In-Hand Series this coming Wednesday, February 22. The reading is free and at capacity – click here to wait list. In THE ART OF FLOATING, Marian spends her days hanging out at the senior center and drinking wine with her best friend Fran. One day her estranged granddaughter MacKinzie calls up and asks to live with her. Her dog has died, and this has occasioned a crisis of faith about what happens to pets after death. Marian and Mackinzie don’t know each other, they don’t know much about each other, and they have very different points of view on the world. And then a dirigible crashes in Marian’s backyard. Generally, I am not one for autobiographical plays. But this play is basically an attempt for me to sort out some things I’ve been trying to understand since I moved to Utah five and a half years ago. Death and the LDS church. While I have obviously had experience with death before, since moving to Utah my family has had three grandmas, one college roommate, and four pets die. Off the top of my head. One grandma, in particular, left a huge gaping hole in me that even now, three years later, just hangs out. I know where the hole is and how to avoid it most of the time. But it’s still there. She was my most favorite person on earth, the person I called to talk to all the time, and I’m still...

Tim Slover on his play VIRTUE

Playwright Tim Slover makes his Plan-B debut with VIRTUE, about Hildegard of Bingen, which has journeyed through development at Penn State School of Theatre (which commissioned the play), Salt Lake Acting Company, the Bush Theatre in London, the Fulton Theatre in Pennsylvania and the graduate theatre program at the University of Georgia before premiering February 16-26 at Plan-B. Below are some of his thoughts about the play, which also appears in the February issue of QSaltLake. Over the last couple of decades, the LGBT community, led by visionary and courageous individuals, has realized many gains in legal, societal and artistic status. As a theist, I am particularly interested in the intersection of the LGBT community and spiritual and religious experience. Particularly, is there room in religions—mainstream and otherwise—for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people? Is there a place in the LGBT community for believers, even Christian believers? Or given the lamentable and well-rutted history of scriptural (mis)interpretation of sexuality by many Christian communities and the antipathy towards Christian believers by many in the LGBT community, must these two streams of human experience forever be divided? Enter Abbess Hildegard of Bingen. If you lived in Twelfth Century Europe, even if you were a lay person without benefit of reading, you would probably have heard of Hildegard. She was a leader of Benedictine sisters on the banks of the Rhine River in a mixed-gender monastery, a not unimportant fact since it signals that this was a time before many of the rules, codes and strictures of devotional religious life were set in stone. Hildegard wrote books of midwifery and herbal medicine; she composed music so remarkable and distinctive...

What is HealthyHildegard.com?

The folks at HealthyHildegard.com heard about Tim Slover’s play VIRTUE about Hildegard of Bingen, premiering February 16-26 at Plan-B (click here for more information and tickets) and published a feature about the play on their website. So we turned the tables on them! Tell us a little about yourselves. We are friends and family: brother, sister, cousin, and friend. We all spent much of our younger years on paths of corporate pursuits in finance and investment, law, marketing, and philanthropy. At some point in our late 30’s we started making course corrections to adjust our life trajectories. Through individual processes of creating change, taking new risks, and attempting to honor our truer selves, we came together to build the Healthy Hildegard project. Janice, Josh, and Gary live in Denver, Colorado. Jan lives in Berlin, Germany. When not working on Healthy Hildegard, we all have other pursuits, our “day jobs”.  Janice is the president of a Denver-based non-profit foundation, Josh runs a financial consulting firm, Jan manages artistic event space in repurposed buildings, and Gary is a writer and occasional business advisor. You each clearly feel a strong connection to Hildegard. What about her speaks to you the most? We have all come to find our own personal connections with Hildegard of Bingen and her work. Ultimately, Hildegard’s creative power binds us in our Healthy Hildegard project. Not just the process of creative expression, which is indeed a big part of her story, but how giving-in to that natural, generative potential within us (our viriditas) can transform and empower us to become something more, to live a better life. When Hildegard decided to...

An open invitation to virtually gather with Plan-B on January 19 to resist intolerance at all levels

Click here if you are already ready to download the graphic. Otherwise, read on! This is an open invitation to anyone who has ever worked with Plan-B Theatre in any way on a production or reading, and anyone who has ever attended a Plan-B production:  January 19 is The Ghostlight Project, where theatre folk across the country are gathering outside of theaters on the eve of the Presidential Inauguration, people will join in a collective, simultaneous action, together creating “light” for challenging times ahead. Inspired by the tradition of leaving a “ghost light” on in a darkened theater, artists and communities will make or renew a pledge to stand for and protect the values of inclusion, participation, and compassion for everyone regardless of race, class, religion, country of origin, immigration status, (dis)ability, gender identity, or sexual orientation. January 19th is a moment of gathering within a larger resistance to intolerance at all levels. We aim to create brave spaces that will serve as lights in the coming years. We aim to activate a network of people across the country working to support vulnerable communities. This is not a substitution for protests or direct action, but rather a pledge for continued vigilance and increased advocacy. We define “a brave space” as a space where: ● It is safe to be who you are, regardless of race, class, religion, country of origin, immigration status, (dis)ability, gender identity, or sexual orientation. ● Diverse opinions, dissent, and argument are not only tolerated, but invited. ● Active listening and courageous exchange are fundamental values. ● Collective action, activism, and community engagement, both within and...

Matthew Ivan Bennett on RADIO HOUR EPISODE 11: YULETIDE

RADIO HOUR EPISODE 11: YULETIDE by Matthew Ivan Bennett receives its world premiere in a co-production with KUER’S RadioWest on December 8, 2016 featuring Doug Fabrizo, Jay Perry and Teresa Sanderson, with original music by Dave Evanoff and eFoley by Jennifer Freed, directed by Cheryl Cluff. One year, when I was a kid, the toy I really, really wanted was a toy microphone you could “broadcast” with over the radio. I don’t remember who made it — Fisher Price? Mattel? — but it was bright plastic yellow. I got it! And I played with it all day long in my Christmas pajamas. This is how it worked: you would select an empty static station on the radio, like 107.3 FM, and then you’d set the toy to 107.3, and you could hear yourself through the radio! It only had a range of 20 feet or so, but what I’d do was hide in the coat closet, behind my dad’s tan wool trench coat and under the boxes of Kodak slides, and I’d wait for my family to walk into the dining room before greeting them with what I thought was a booming phantom voice: “Aggghhh!” Usually, I gave myself away by panting heavily into the mic or snickering. Another year what I really, madly, deeply desperately needed was the He-Man Snake Mountain play set. Again, I wanted it because it had a microphone. It had, I think, some sort of echo effect, so you could sound just like a cartoon villain in his lair. Probably, Mr. and Mrs. Claus regretted giving me these toys because they were loud and I used them...

Pin It on Pinterest