Teresa Sanderson on the meaning of 3

Teresa Sanderson received the 2013 City Weekly Arty Award for “Best Local Theatre Performance” for Plan-B’s ERIC(A), which also toured to Good Company Theatre in Ogden, United Solo Theatre Festival in New York and Theatre Out in California.  She has also appeared in Plan-B’s PUSHING THE ENVELOPE: AN EVENING OF ONE-ACTS, ANIMAL FARM, TRAGEDY: A TRAGEDY, THE ALIENATION EFFEKT, EXPOSED, DI ESPERIENZA, MESA VERDE and all six RADIO HOURs (most recently Eric Samuelsen’s EPISODE 9: FAIRYANA). Therefore you are to be perfect, as your Heavenly Father is perfect. Matthew 5:48  As I have been rehearsing Eric Samuelsen’s new play 3, I have talked to more than one active Mormon woman who talked about this notion, that they are always striving for perfection. An admirable goal, but I worry that we beat ourselves up trying to achieve it, get caught up in the minutiae, worry about how it looks and forget the important stuff. When we put that kind of pressure on ourselves it is easy to blame society, or men, or the Church. But the truth is women are very hard on themselves and I worry that the goal is unachievable. During the rehearsal process, we have talked a lot about this idea of perfection and Christy Summerhays shared a definition I think I could live with. The Hebrew word (tam or tamim) doesn’t carry the meaning “without flaw” as the term perfection does in English. It means “complete” or “mature” or “healthy.” I have always been leery of perfection, in fact, on my script for ERIC(A), the play I did for Plan-B last season, I have written in my...

MaryBeth Jarvis Clark on why she loves Plan-B Theatre

MaryBeth Jarvis Clark is a Plan-B subscriber and $1,000 donor. I have a long list of reasons for supporting Plan-B Theatre Company: local playwrights, national exposure, topics I think I know a lot about, topics that seem totally new to me, top-notch actors and directors, professional productions on a shoestring budget, bargain prices, intimate performance space, taking an anti-bullying message to schoolkids. Currently #1 on that list: Plan-B Theatre Company has given me an awesome social life. That’s right. I used to sit at home, sad and lonely. Then I started going to Plan-B Theatre productions, and now I’m out almost every night, I have interesting things to talk about at parties, I chat people up on the street, I have Jerry Rapier’s cell phone number, and I’m in demand as a guest blogger. All this can be yours. You just need to like Plan-B on Facebook or buy a ticket to a show. Suddenly you will be in the know, a recipient of informative and enticing messages about Plan-B productions. You’ll rekindle an old friendship with a pal who’s always wanted a theatre partner. You’ll spot people in the audience at Plan-B shows who you know from work, school, community organizations. You’ll run into them later at other functions and talk about what a fantastic show that was at Plan-B. You’ll want to become a season subscriber, never to be shut out of a sold-out run again. You’ll be so impressed by what you see at Plan-B that you’ll want to become a supporter, proud to see your name printed in the list of donors. Attend a full...

Playwright Debora Threedy on why she supports Plan-B Theatre

Debora Threedy’s plays THE END OF THE HORIZON, WALLACE and THE THIRD CROSSING all received their world premieres at Plan-B.  She is also a subscriber and $1,000 donor. This is why I support Plan-B and why you should, too: As a theatregoer, I like Plan-B. I like that it’s a “black box” theatre because that means I never know what the theatre is going to look like until I get there. For every production, the theatre is a little different, sometimes a lot different. Sometimes all the audience is on one side, sometimes it’s on three sides, sometimes there’s a set with levels, and sometimes there’s just a painted floor. For every production, the theatre itself is unique. And I like that the theatre space is so intimate. I like the feeling of watching something special with a select group of people. I like when we all laugh together, or sigh together, or pretend we’re not tearing up together. I like being close to the actors, being able to see every twitch of the emotions on their faces. I like to see them breathe and, yes, sweat: at big theatres, you can forget you’re watching living people, because they are so far away and we’re so used to watching recorded performances. At Plan-B you can never, ever forget that these are real, flesh-and-blood people in front of you, or that all of you, actors and audience, are on this journey together, right here, right now. I like Plan-B’s philosophy. I like its social consciousness. I like its high standards. The scripts are always provocative, and the acting is always...

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