Teresa Sanderson's Most Memorable Plan-B Role

Teresa Sanderson has appeared in Plan-B’s Script-In-Hand Series, a slew of SLAMs, all but one RADIO HOUR, STAGE DIRECTIONS, ANIMAL FARM, TRAGEDY: A TRAGEDY, THE ALIENATION EFFEKT, EXPOSED, DI ESPERIENZA and MESA VERDE. Pick my most memorable Plan-B role? I’m not sure how to do that. Each one has been a rich and rewarding experience. It is sort of like picking a favorite child. My history with Plan-B is long. I have made life long friends, and feel lucky to be part of the Plan-B family. There’s ANIMAL FARM (my kids’ favorite) and TRAGEDY: A TRAGEDY (my husband’s favorite). I guess if I have to pick, I am going to have to say Mary Dickson’s EXPOSED, about the impact of nuclear testing on our state and our nation. To be part of telling Mary’s personal story, thousands of people’s story, as it turns out, was a great honor. It is a huge responsibility to play real people on stage. In EXPOSED I was excited and intimidated all at the same time. I knew that all of the characters that I played were going to see the show at one point or another. Now I can really relate to the fact the we were an easy target. Patriotic people who are used to following what our leaders said. I am a very patriotic person, brought up to respect authority. Both of my parents were public servants. My father an authority figure. I did what he said and never ask why. Our government told us we would be safe, and we believed them. I can imagine myself on test days sitting...

WHY I SUPPORT PLAN-B – Mike Thompson

Since 2001, Plan-B has produced plays that place LGBT issues center stage. Plays such as: A PERFECT GANESH – 2001 THE LARAMIE PROJECT – 2001 MY LEFT BREAST – 2002 HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH – 2003, 2005 BASH: LATTERDAY PLAYS – 2003 A LETTER TO HARVEY MILK – 2004 PATIENT A – 2005 MIASMA – 2006 FACING EAST – 2006, 2007 THE ALIENATION EFFEKT – 2007 THE TRICKY PART – 2008 DI ESPERIENZA – 2009 To recognize Plan-B’s exceptional commitment to these important issues, Equality Utah honored Plan-B with our 2007 Allies for Equality award. I am honored to personally support Plan-B’s unique and socially conscious...

DI ESPERIENZA – Jann Haworth

Unfinished business. Jumping in the deep end wasn’t something I willingly did when I was the victim of the screaming swimming teacher for the Girl Scout swimming badge. I believe she was ex-Gestapo. I knew how to swim but she terrified me so I never finished the work for the badge (nor the cooking badge either for that matter, but I did get the butterfly badge because nobody told me to do it). Leonardo’s grand scale of ”the unfinished’ is of course on an altogether loftier level than my nine-year-old poolside failure and his has been a topic for thought throughout the re-acquaintance with his story over the last months. Reasons Artists Procrastinate 1. Fear: as long as something is unfinished it can’t be thought or said to be bad or wrong. 2. Not wanting to cut the umbilical cord: when the process is complete you lose the tissue of thought that enriched your mind while working on the piece – the adventure, the discovery, the story-the work becomes a lone thing on its own. 3. Another compelling project steals your mind and you forget what interested you in the previous work by the time you go back to it. You have moved on. You have changed. 4. Starting: there are too many options and you can’t establish the fences. 5. Environment: too many interruptions, temptations, distractions, visitors. 6. There would be more, not the least of which would be money – the need to put ready-money jobs ahead of long term ‘masterworks.’ And of course with Leonardo we don’t know how much has been lost, so the notebooks...

DI ESPERIENZA – Kirt Bateman

‘Nothing goes more swiftly than the years.’ ┬áThat’s a quote from Leonardo Da Vinci and a line in DI ESPERIENZA. Now it’s the title of my brilliant blog entry. I have had the pleasure of acting in Matt’s short pieces in every single SLAM I’ve acted in and done a reading of his play Y&Y, so I thought I’d know what to expect. It seems like yesterday that we were sitting in the Black Box workshopping a brand new play, DI ESPERIENZA, by the stunningly talented young chap, Matthew Ivan Bennett. I had been asked to read Judas (and the other characters that come along with him). During the rehearsals for the reading, I experienced constant doubt about my ability to play the role…I mean constant! That’s the point of the character of Judas – he serves as the antagonist to good ol’ Leo, ‘malice, panic, self-doubt.’ So, I should have been perfect. Alas I did not feel so. Nevertheless, by the end of the workshop, I wanted to play the role so badly I could hardly stand it. I have been very, VERY fortunate to be in several amazing Plan-B shows..but at the end of each, I think that it will most likely be my last (‘Soon, they’re going to catch on to me and realize that I have no idea what I’m doing and that I’m a complete hack’). So, here was yet another opportunity to muck up something beautiful. We opened this weekend. It was scary and exhilarating. In this amazing Canadian TV series (p.s. I love Toronto) SLINGS & ARROWS, the director of HAMLET says...

DI ESPERIENZA – Teresa Sanderson

Tech week…okay, usually it is a nightmare. There are stories about tech weeks, the rehearsals can be long tedious, epic rehearsals. Not so for us, we are so lucky, Jesse has been with us all week (Jesse Portillo our light designer) And he has been building every light cue to our rhythms. We are still fine-tuning but the light feels so good. Add sound, which is designed with intricate precision by Cheryl Ann Cluff. Period(ish) costumes by Jann Haworth and my clunky transitions are suddenly becoming clear…well clearer. I think we stopped the rehearsal one time yesterday, (a tech rehearsal mind you) to clean up technical stuff, so we got in a good run. Jerry took us out for a lovely dinner and notes. Hey only a page and a half of notes (not the 5 or 6 pages we started the week with) so we are getting closer. Sunday wasn’t as good a run for me, mumble mouth. And the words are rich beautiful words, but don’t get one out of order. Yesterday I felt ‘in’ the scenes today I was busy thinking, “Do I button my jacket here? Has that light always done that? Do I wait until after the sound cue? Is my hair falling out? Where is that damn quill?” Oh yeah and I have to talk too (with feeling please). Well, we have another shot at it on Tuesday. Then soon I’ll have to stop thinking so hard and just let it live. I love that part. Turns out I love the whole process, I love the research, the stumble thru, trying things that...

DI ESPERIENZA – Tracie Merrill

One of the most common questions actors hear is ‘How do you learn all of those lines?’ Some scripts are easy to learn and some are a pain in the ass, but to be honest, learning lines is one of the most basic stepping-stones there is for what we do. Holding a script in the earliest part of rehearsals is handicapping. Only so much can be done. So earlier this week, when all four of us actors walked onto the stage without our scripts, it was an exciting moment. Time for the real work to begin. And time for a bit of comedy. Because, let’s face it, frustrated actors are funny, and flailing around trying to remember a forgotten line is frustrating. Hilarity ensues. Well, for now, anyway. In a few more days it becomes frustrating and unprofessional. The rules in the theatre world are ever changing, so you have to work to keep up. The language in DI ESPERIENZA is complex to say the least, unbelievably rich and expressive. Throughout the text, actual excerpts from da Vinci’s notebooks are used, and those are probably the most challenging lines to memorize. The goal is to be word perfect, and man, that is always a feat. However, we do have help – our stage manager, Jennifer Freed. One of her MANY jobs is to follow the script during our rehearsals, calling out our lines when we ask for help and marking down mistakes when we’re on a roll so she can correct us later. Not an easy task. I repeat, not easy. Our success is heavily dependent on Jen and...

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