Jason Tatom on being the RADIO HOUR newbie

Jason Tatom has previously appeared in Plan-B’s EXPOSED and LADY MACBETH, as well as several SLAMs and the Script-In-Hand Series reading of 8. Hi everybody. I’m Jason, and I’m the new guy. I’ve been lucky enough to work for Plan-B many times, but when it comes to RADIO HOUR, I’m definitely a newbie. I’ve been a fan of RADIO HOUR for a few years now, and always thought how great it would be to get to be a part of these projects one day. Then they stopped. For a little while anyway. One day (during the adrenaline filled 24 hours of this year’s SLAM, come to think of it) I decided to just ask Jerry if I could be a part of any future RADIO HOURs, and was thrilled to find out that the series was coming back. Now, here I am, The new guy. I gotta tell ya, that first read through was a little intimidating. These people have been doing this for some time now, and I just wanted to fit in. Well, maybe “fitting in” was a little optimistic, I was personally trying to not suck. Yeah, not sucking is an alright starting point, I can definitely build on that. I was introduced to radio shows as a young teen. You should understand that I was a pretty awkward young man. Chubby, thick glasses, deathly shy, and not the least bit athletically inclined, so I ended up spending a lot of time by myself listening to the radio. We had a HUGE console radio in our front room. You know, the kind with the 8-track player,...

Matthew Ivan Bennett on creating RADIO HOUR EPISODE 7: SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE BLUE CARBUNCLE

Matthew Ivan Bennett has premiered RADIO HOUR: LAVENDER & EXILE, RADIO HOUR: FRANKENSTEIN, BLOCK 8, DI ESPERIENZA, RADIO HOUR: ALICE and MESA VERDE with Plan-B Theatre Company.  His play ERIC(A) is also part of the 2012/13 season. Like a lot of kids, I was introduced to radio theatre on family trips. My parents liked to tune into AM radio on long drives and from the back of the station wagon I heard sketch comedy like Nichols and May. Once, on the last day of school in the seventh grade, I think, our administration played Abbot and Costello’s WHO’S ON FIRST? over the PA system and I became obsessed with the sketch. My dad, it turned out, had it on cassette tape (along with THE SHADOW) and at one time I had a long chunk of it memorized. My cousin Nate and I even recorded our own radio shows using a little gray boom box. I vividly remember recording myself one morning after a sleepover saying, “I slept with my socks on last night!” and then laughing hysterically. That was my younger self’s version of a joke. My cousin and I listened to that “joke” over and over. When I was in high school drama, I thought, “I want to be a radio actor.” I told my teacher Russ Johnson and he kindly informed me that there weren’t many radio actors anymore. I was a weird mixture of insecure and confident as a teenaged theatre person: I could act with my voice, but not the rest of my body. So I wanted to do radio. Once I got into college,...

Radio Hour Episode 7: Sherlock Holmes and the Blue Carbuncle

Radio Hour Episode 7: Sherlock Holmes and the Blue CarbuncleBios RADIO HOUR EPISODE 7: SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE BLUE CARBUNCLE a world premiere by Matthew Ivan Bennett adapted from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle presented in partnership with KUER’s RadioWest December 18, 2012  |  7pm and 8:30pm SOLD OUT! 7pm performance also broadcast live on KUER 90.1 $20 reserved seating ($10 students) Running time 1 hour Jeanne Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner 138 W 300 S, SLC Click here for tickets or call 801.355.ARTS After six episodes (2005-2010) and a year off, Plan-B’s RADIO HOUR partnership with KUER’s RadioWest returns with EPISODE 7: SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE BLUE CARBUNCLE. Holmes & Watson must discover how the Countess of Morcar’s stolen jewel came to be inside a Christmas goose. The mystery begins with a street fight and ends with a full confession. Join this wild goose chase of a holiday whodunit, performed as radio drama with you as the live studio audience!  A holiday treat for the whole family (ages 8+) and undoubtedly the most unique family entertainment of the holiday season! Featuring Bill Allred as Watson, Doug Fabrizio as Holmes, with Jay Perry and Jason Tatom as everyone else.  Foley by Mark & Eric Robinette.  Directed by Cheryl Ann Cluff. PRESS Cast/Creative Bios & Playwright’s Statement  |  City Weekly  |  Gavin’s Underground  |  Plan-B Blog Posts from Playwright Matthew Ivan Bennett and actors Jason Tatom, Doug Fabrizio & Bill Allred  |  KUER’s RadioWest (9/19/12 – 43:28)  |  The Salt Lake Tribune profile of playwright Matthew Ivan Bennett  |  Selective Echo  |  The Salt Lake Tribune profile of actor Doug Fabrizio  |  UtahTheatreBloggers Interview with...

Jay Perry on RADIO HOUR MARATHON

Acting in all five installments of RADIO HOUR…wow, what an incredible journey! It was such a great thing to be a part of each of the past five years. As I gained more and more experience with radio drama it became a genre I simply want more of. I actually prefer it to any other type of acting. The world that can exist in the mind, transferred through sound, is limitless. When the audience has no set, costumes, lights or props, and it’s all shaved down to an audible experience, they can let their imagination run wild and fill in the gaps in an unbridled and very personal way. I have the same experience performing it. With the visual aspects left to the imagination, the world of the play has a dimension that is less fixed and gives my mind more to play with. The physical part of the work does not stop happening and you really have to listen not only to your fellow actors, but to the foley world that seems to be happening all around you with those headphones on. You are creating a living picture of sound that is unique for each person hearing it. I can still see, taste, smell and feel the environments we created. I still shiver when I twist a piece of celery. And I feel an adrenaline rush whenever a door slowly…creeks…open… I can still hear the great Tony Larimer’s voice and those of all of the incredible actors and the people, monsters, spectres and spirits they created. The radio is absolutely awesome in its power to electrify – and...

SHE WAS MY BROTHER and RADIO HOUR MARATHON – Both this week!

Cheryl Ann Cluff: Our interest in live radio drama began with RADIO MACBETH in 1996. The live audience listened to the story, presented as a psychological radio drama, in a 1940’s style ‘living room’, complete with a vintage Westinghouse radio. The actors and foley (sound effects artist) performed the show in nearby rooms, concealed from the audience’s view. We then produced THE PBTC RADIO SHOW in 1998, which included an original adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s THE RATS IN THE WALLS; then THE WAR OF THE WORLDS in 2002, with Mercury Theatre’s original 1930’s script. Both productions were presented before a live ‘studio’ audience, with THE WAR OF THE WORLDS broadcasting live on KRCL. A few years later, we created Plan-B’s RADIO HOUR, which was broadcast live on KUER’s RadioWest on three consecutive Halloweens as episodes of RadioWest – RADIO POE (2005), THE HITCHHIKER & ZERO HOUR (2006) and LAVENDER & EXILE (2007). These were presented in-studio only, and each included a small studio audience of about 10 people. We had so much fun in the KUER studio we decided to re-combine the theatre experience with the radio experience. So we moved RADIO HOUR back into the theatre in 2008 and 2009, allowing us to have a true ‘live studio audience’ for the KUER live broadcast on Halloween. In 2005, 2006 and 2007 there was a single live broadcast in the morning which was recorded and re-broadcast that evening. The twist in 2008 and 2009, in addition to being back in the theatre, is that we did two live broadcasts on Halloween! There are three reasons why I like live...

Playwright Matthew Ivan Bennett on creating this year's RADIO HOUR

I remember as a kid, maybe fourteen, gleefully listening to my father’s Abbot and Costello and “The Shadow” cassette tapes, and really wondering why the radio play became unpopular. I mean, I understood that television supplanted radio…What I wondered is why the two mediums, both so interesting, couldn’t co-exist. Why must technology be “updated” rather than, say, diversified? Even though TV is capable of technically duplicating all that radio does, AND adds the element of the image, TV still doesn’t duplicate the experience. With radio, the images live inside of you–it’s like having a book read aloud to you (which, in a child-like way, is more fun than reading yourself). What I also dig about radio is that it can be enjoyed in the dark, lying down, or in the mountains if you can catch a signal. The title of my first play came from a turn of phrase I heard over the radio (Coast-to-Coast AM with Art Bell) when I was camping in college. I was fifteen feet from a gurgling brook, staring at stars, tending coals in a firepit. I even like it when a signal doesn’t come in totally clearly–it forces you to listen carefully. Writing for Plan-B’s RADIO HOUR has reminded me, too, that our culture is so saturated with entertainment that it’s lost novelty. If you listen to an old radio show, you’ll notice that they’re very presentational and have an aura of luxury. The announcer voice invites you into the experience like you’re a special guest. The old shows weren’t just shows; they were produced like big events. I tried to capture a...

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