Why (in)divisible?

All performances of (in)divisible through June 18 (presented as part of our Script-In-Hand Series) are technically at capacity, but you can still see the show. Free + summer = a certain number of no-shows! Click here for details, waitlist and walk-up info. Below each of the 17 actors share their thoughts on what drew them to participate in (in)divisible. Everything in (in)divisible is rooted in real-life experience and the parameters are pretty strict: no mentioning of Trump or Clinton, or even allusions to them – when those names surface in conversation, listening seems to cease. And listening is the goal. The lack of respect for those with whom we differ is at the root of the quagmire we find ourselves in as a country. Identifying people by labels creates polarity. And the more polarized we become, the less chance there is for real communication and real change. We’re not asking people to agree; we’re asking people to listen to those whom they may normally write off as “the other.” The greatest challenge of (in)divisible has been for each playwright to write their own point of view. The opposite point of view was much easier: it could be looked at objectively as a piece of theatre, as a character to treat as truthfully as possible. But when faced with representing their own point of view, each playwright felt immense pressure to avoid being preachy or didactic. The result is pretty magical: each playwright examined their own biases and fears and is boldly and frankly sharing what they found. Grasping for a wisp of magic, in a thundercloud … – Joe Debevc While growing up Japanese American in Utah,...

(in)divisible is coming June 8-18 and it’s free!

(in)divisible is our response to the response to the election. But it’s not about Trump. Or Clinton. Or Sanders. Or Obama. Or any other political figure. As the project took shape, we followed two ground rules: (1) none of the above could be mentioned or even alluded to because when they are mentioned, listening ceases; and (2) everything had to be rooted in real-life experience. (in)divisible is about our country. (in)divisible is about its citizens. (in)divisible is about us. Twelve local playwrights have each created two five-minute pieces: one liberal and one conservative. Scroll down to see who they are and their thoughts on the pieces they’ve created – stories from some people you’ll agree with, some people you’ll disagree with, all who just happen to be just like you. (in(divisible is a reminder of what it means to listen. Click here to reserve your free tickets and see who’s in the cast. We ask that in lieu of a ticket purchase you make a contribution to The Children’s Center at the theatre.   Click here to reserve your free tickets...

Shauna Brock on Building Families

Shauna Brock shared her story of building a family through an LGBTQIA (and allies) lens in a 4-week writing workshop led by Eric Samuelsen at Art Access. She and her fellow writers were then mentored by a playwright from The Lab at Plan-B. Eric then wove their stories together into an evening of theatre, which will be performed as INTERSECTIONS II: FORGING FAMILY FROM MORE THAN DNA on April 28-29 as part of Plan-B’s Script-In-Hand Series at Art Access. Click here for details and tickets ($10 general admission, $5 students). It’s funny when you think about it, and when you overthink it, that the theme of intersections and found family can be applied as much to a writing workshop as to the families we find and create – especially for the queer community. Strangers come together in a room and over time they work together, they bond. Stories, the histories that bind us together, are shared. It’s scary to enter a workshop, to know that you are putting your experiences out there and know they will be judged by everyone at the table. How they are received, how they are welcomed and discussed sets the entire tone and either creates trust or destroys inspiration. Again, how similar to our family structures. Going into this INTERSECTIONS workshop, I had no idea what story I wanted to tell. Surrounded by Mormons expressing the passion of coming out stories and tales of family ties in homeless bonds, I sat there thinking of my own family, my own bonds – because my biological ones are as tight as those I have chosen to create as family. How do I...

Rob Tennant on his play QUARTER HORSE

Rob Tennant is a member of The Lab at Plan-B, where his play BOOKSMART enjoyed a sold-out run last season. Rob’s play QUARTER HORSE is the next offering of our 2016/17 Script-In-Hand Series this coming Wednesday, March 29, directed by Robert Scott Smith, stage managed by Joe Killian, with Emma Scotson as the Reader and featuring a cast of Olivia Custodio, Sky Kawaiw, Shawn Francis Saunders and Matthew Sincell. The reading is free and at capacity – click here for details. The hardest I’ve ever laughed was on day four of an ill-advised weeklong outdoor adventure. I was one of eight young men camping beside an ankle-deep “river” in the middle of the most remote piece of desert in the USA, days behind schedule with limited food and silt-clogged water filters. Bone-tired from a 12-hour day of slogging through mud with a small boat in which I was supposed to be riding, someone broke the settled quiet gloom with a simple statement. “We’re all going to die out here,” he said. We all laughed until we cried, our guffaws returning to us off of redrock canyon walls for minutes on end. There’s room for comedy in any situation – gallows humor is a powerful thing. A world in which we have run out of oil and are forced to ride bicycles everywhere isn’t necessarily a dystopia for me. To each their own. What terrifies me is the prospect of a future where we’ve done everything wrong and it’s all for naught because we haven’t learned from our mistakes. A world where individual interest continues to be prioritized above communal good. A world where...

Jenny Kokai on her play THE ART OF FLOATING

Jennifer A. Kokai is a member of The Lab at Plan-B and teaches at Weber State University. Jenny’s play THE ART OF FLOATING is the next offering of our 2016/17 Script-In-Hand Series this coming Wednesday, February 22. The reading is free and at capacity – click here to wait list. In THE ART OF FLOATING, Marian spends her days hanging out at the senior center and drinking wine with her best friend Fran. One day her estranged granddaughter MacKinzie calls up and asks to live with her. Her dog has died, and this has occasioned a crisis of faith about what happens to pets after death. Marian and Mackinzie don’t know each other, they don’t know much about each other, and they have very different points of view on the world. And then a dirigible crashes in Marian’s backyard. Generally, I am not one for autobiographical plays. But this play is basically an attempt for me to sort out some things I’ve been trying to understand since I moved to Utah five and a half years ago. Death and the LDS church. While I have obviously had experience with death before, since moving to Utah my family has had three grandmas, one college roommate, and four pets die. Off the top of my head. One grandma, in particular, left a huge gaping hole in me that even now, three years later, just hangs out. I know where the hole is and how to avoid it most of the time. But it’s still there. She was my most favorite person on earth, the person I called to talk to all the time, and I’m still...

Matthew Ivan Bennett on his play WHAT WE HAD TO

Matthew Ivan Bennett has premiered several plays at Plan-B, most recently A/VERSION OF EVENTS, DIFFERENT=AMAZING and ERIC(A), which won Best Drama at United Solo in New York. Recently, he was a finalist at the O’Neill National Playwrights Conference and has twice been a finalist at the Austin Film Festival. He has also acted for Plan-B, SLAC, Utah Shakespeare Festival and Eclipse in Chicago. Matt is a member of the Dramatists’ Guild. Matt’s play WHAT WE HAD TO opens the 2016/17 Script-In-Hand Series Wednesday, November 16. The event is free and at capacity – click here to wait list. “First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out — Because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out — Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out — Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me — and there was no one left to speak for me.” That poem — which began with Pastor Martin Niemöller — has haunted world politics for at least 60 years. It’s been appropriated by left wing and right. Recently, I remember it being re-worded by gun advocates in the reverberations of the Sandy Hook Massacre. The poem is an exhortation. It says, “Fight back — at the first hint of despotism, fight back.” It demands courage against any and every “They.” It is also the story of someone who did not fight back. The logic of Niemöller’s poem would have us believe that tyranny surges in the...

Pin It on Pinterest