2013 SLAM

10th Anniversary SLAM Five short plays by five Utah playwrights Saturday, May 4, 2013, 8pm $25 reserved seating ($10 students) 500-seat Jeanne Wagner Theatre, Rose Wagner 138 W 300 S, SLC Click here for tickets or call 801.355.ARTS ​ Five short plays by five Utah playwrights are slammed out in 23 hours.  You spend the 24th hour with us to see the results! It’s SLAM’s tenth anniversary – there may just be a surprise.  Or two, or three.  Or ten. PRESS Gavin’s Underground  |  Selective Echo (preview)  |  Selective Echo (review)  |  SLCene/Salt Lake Magazine  |  SLCFeminist Playwrights: Tobin Atkinson, Matthew Ivan Bennett, Jenifer Nii, Eric Samuelsen, Larry West Directors: Alexandra Harbold, Marcine Lake, Kay Shean, Christy Summerhays, one more TBA – Larry West! Actors: Kirt Bateman, Daisy Blake Perry, Anita Booher, April Fossen, Mark Fossen, John Graham, David Holmes, Cooper Howell, Stephanie Howell, Jayne Luke, Topher Rasmussen, Latoya Rhodes, Jason Tatom, Kalyn West, one more TBA – Matthew Ivan Bennett! Designers: Cheryl Cluff, Thomas George, Jann Haworth, Phil Lowe, Rick Pollock, Greg Ragland, Randy Rasmussen, Jesse Portillo Stage Manager: Jennifer Freed Intern: Michael Johnson  ...

Eric Samuelsen's 7 SLAMs.

Eric Samuelsen’s plays MIASMA, AMERIGO and BORDERLANDS received their world premieres at Plan-B Theatre Company. His translation of Henrik Ibsen’s GHOSTS received a large-scale staged reading as part of the SCRIPT-IN-HAND SERIES. This is his 8th SLAM. I live in Provo. When I write for SLAM, I drive to Salt Lake, learn who my actors are going to be, and my play title and the other information I’ll use in writing, and then drive back to Provo to write. That forty-five minute drive is immensely important. I like driving, and I use that time to think about the play. Usually, by the time I make it home, I’ve got at least an idea to work with, and sometimes, I have the whole play mapped out in my head; at least a rough draft of it. Of course, over the course of the night, I’ll usually put the play through two or three more drafts, but generally, the drive south is crucial. My first year [the first year, 2004], I had no idea what to expect. My title was THE BUTCHER, THE BEGGAR AND THE BEDTIME BUDDY, and driving home, the only thing I could come up with was this: three actors to work with; three possible characters in the title. So I came up with a ‘butcher,’ an elderly wealthy rancher; a daughter who kept ‘begging’ him for money for her siblings; and a ‘bed-time buddy,’ his mistress. The play had monologues, was very repetitive — I was told it was a memorization nightmare. But my actors [Stephanie Howell, Tony Larimer, Kay Shean] pulled it off. I was eventually...

Christy Summerhays clogs her way to another SLAM.

Christy Summerhays has appeared in Plan-B’s AMERIKA, MESA VERDE and the Script-In-Hand Series reading of THE NORMAL HEART. Most recently she directed the Plan-B/Gina Bachauer elementary school tour of PETER AND THE WOLF. I have been involved with SLAM from the very beginning. I’m directing this year, but that first year I was one of the actors. I thought it would be new and different and a challenge. If I’m honest, I would have to admit that I never would have agreed to do it if I had known just how challenging it was going to be. Ignorance can sometimes be our friend, and in this case it certainly was.  It may seem an exaggeration to say that that first SLAM changed my life, and maybe it would be, but not by far. My first experience acting in a SLAM play was truly – and this time I do not exaggerate at all – one of the most terrifying experiences of my life. But what happens when you successfully survive such terror is an exhilaration that really cannot be described. And here’s the “how SLAM changed my life” part. Very soon after I had successfully survived my first SLAM I found myself in a very, very intimidating situation that would normally paralyze me, and guess what? It didn’t. This is what happened instead: I looked around the room at all the intimidating people and thought, “You don’t know what I just did. I just acted in SLAM . . . you people can’t scare me!” This strange empowerment lasted for months and in subtle, but real ways, affected the...

Daisy Blake Perry gets her SLAM on. Again.

Daisy Blake Perry has previously appeared in Plan-B’s Script-In-Hand Series readings of THE NORMAL HEART and 8. SLAM is . . . an all-you-can-eat buffet of fear for me. Let’s just put this on the table, yes, I act, but I also have OCD, a hard time with change and a strong dislike of the unknown. Oh yes, and this year I started having panic attacks. And that’s exactly why I’m doing SLAM for the fourth time. To walk through the fire. Every time I finish, I resolve that this will be my last one, and then enough time elapses that you think “Oh, this’ll be fun, a good challenge, face my fears!” Then about two months before, life turns into BS and AS – suddenly you’re on a countdown to the day, reminding yourself when every other little challenge that comes along: “Well at least this isn’t as scary as SLAM!” I know this might sound like I’m being dramatic, but at the beginning of the last SLAM I did in 2010, my only reassurance when I went on stage was literally, “Well, I know the first line.” I wasn’t sure any of the rest of it was in my head at all. Oh, and the OTHER thing this year is because it’s the ten-year anniversary, Jerry says there are some “surprises” in store, “but don’t try to guess, you won’t.” Don’t try to guess, are you kidding me? I’ve come up with a whole list. My favorites are that this year, SLAM will be either improv or mime, but I somehow don’t think that’s going to happen....

Kalyn West SLAMs again.

Kalyn West has appeared in several Script-In-Hand Series readings and THE THIRD CROSSING at Plan-B, for which she received City Weekly’s 2013 Arty Award for “Best Theatre Performance.” My first experience with SLAM last year was a whirlwind! I had little idea what to expect so I just decided to dive in with both hands in the air, ready for the ride. And a ride it was. Everyone was pumped, everyone was excited, everyone had a healthy dose of nerves. Of course, there were some SLAM veterans around to guide the newbies and it made the whole experience so enjoyable. My Freshman and Sophomore years at Weber State University I participated in a similar project called “Play In A Day,” acting my first year and writing my second. So I’d had a dose of this intensive creativity before. While it was a wild experience, it was merely the training wheels for SLAM. This was the big time. SLAM is wild, courageous, determined, delightful, awesome. There was such an impressive caliber of material to work with and a tremendously talented group of individuals involved. Perhaps not the most amazing theater out there, but man, it was an exercise in theatrical stamina and retention, a chance to collaborate and play, and flex that actor muscle that wants to know deep down if it can pull this off. (And yes, it can.) So here we go! Bring it on year two! Plan-B Theatre Company’s 10th Anniversary SLAM – where we create, rehearse and perform five 10-minute plays in 24 hours – is Saturday, May 4, 2013 at 8pm.  Click here for tickets, video...

The third SLAM's the charm for Latoya Rhodes

Latoya Rhodes has appeared in Plan-B’s 10th anniversary revival of HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH and several Script-In-Hand Series readings. Is this really going to be my third SLAM in a row? Yes, yes it is. I am not going to lie, being asked to come back last year I thought to myself, “Are you sure?” But then to be asked to come back for a third time really blows my mind. This year, however, feels a little different. Why does it feel a little different? I ponder this question. Let’s reflect back and see if I can come up with an answer. SLAM 2011: I was, as Plan-B Theatre calls it, a SLAM Virgin. I remember receiving the invitation to be part of the cast and I instantly was terrified. I mean back at Southern Utah University we did 24-hour theater festivals every semester, so I was aware of the process; however, I dabble in the directing side, and even the writing part of it . . . but NEVER wanted to act. Not because I didn’t love it, it’s because I thought to myself, “How in the world do you memorize 10 pages in a few hours and then give a quality performance?” No thank you, I said to myself. So when Plan-B asked me, and when I replied back yes, I kind of took a step back and was like, what are you doing?! So, I arrived early, and met my castmates and director, got my script, and just like I thought, I completely struggled with memorizing the lines! I was freaked out. My first SLAM director was...

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