Betsy Ross remembers her son David Fetzer

Please click here to read Betsy Ross’ cover article in the December 11, 2013 edition of Salt Lake City Weekly about her son David Fetzer. Please join us at the Kick-Off Event for the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists (aka The Davey Foundation) on December 17 at the Tower Theatre – click here for more information and to purchase tickets (only $10!) to that event as well as information on Plan-B’s open call for scripts for playwrights ages 35 and younger (deadline January 31,...

Actor Lauren Byington-Noll remembers working with David Fetzer

Lauren Byington-Noll appeared with our dear, departed friend David Fetzer in Plan-B’s world premiere of Jenifer Nii’s THE SCARLET LETTER in 2012. David Fetzer let me wipe my snot on his shoulder every night.  That is the embarrassing truth.  Since any sort of heightened emotional life turns my nose into a faucet, I should have taken a closer look when deciding to become an actor.  Usually when I’m in a show that demands that of me (most of them), I’m planted with a handkerchief (as a result of the humiliating conversation that everyone has to have about how we should handle my snot situation).  In THE SCARLET LETTER, David’s shirt was it.  There was a moment I had to take every night when we embraced after the “big scene” and I took the upstage side with my head and he let me do it.  This is the generosity of David Fetzer as a scene partner.  He was generous with more than his sleeve on stage.  I trusted David Fetzer, one hundred percent, no questions asked.  I knew every time I met him in that black box, he would give me everything he had, and he would offer me a safe place to give what I could.  We didn’t have to talk about the scenes later, hash out our backstory with each other, or discuss where we were getting stuck.  We just did our work in the space, and then we could talk about dinosaurs and snot because I knew he was going to be there when we got back to the stage.  I miss him and that amazing, goofy...

Actor Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin remembers working with David Fetzer

Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin appeared with our dear, departed friend David Fetzer in Plan-B’s world premiere of Debora Threedy’s THE THIRD CROSSING in 2012. David was enigmatic and charming and one of the funniest people I have ever known. Truth be told, off the stage he was a well-loved and adored goofball. He had a wicked sense of humor that was so quick. What I remember most is his laughter and his doodles. He was gracious, accepting gum or a mint before every stage kiss without a beat. On stage, he was just as charismatic and lovely. His actor choices were bold and nuanced. He made you feel something with every character he embodied. He was a gifted actor, and you automatically wanted to be better when you played opposite him. I am so glad I had the opportunity to work with him. Please join us at the Kick-Off Event for the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists (aka The Davey Foundation) on December 17 at the Tower Theatre – click here for more information and to purchase tickets (only $10!) to that event as well as information on Plan-B’s open call for scripts for playwrights ages 35 and younger (deadline January 31,...

Stephanie Howell remembers working with David Fetzer

Stephanie Howell appeared with our dear, departed friend David Fetzer in Plan-B’s world premiere of Debora Threedy’s THE END OF THE HORIZON in 2008. That laugh. That perfect laugh. Working with David was knowing that at any moment you might be lucky enough to hear it. That utterly incongruous and completely contagious giggle. Sometimes, even when you didn’t hear it, you knew it was there . . . bubbling just underneath the surface, and you’d see it, or feel it. In the way he grabbed your hand as you were about to make an entrance. In the glint in his eye when a moment on stage didn’t go quite as planned — partners in crime. David was the kind of actor that made each of us a better actor — and really, when it came down to it a better person — just by being his beautiful, joyful, sincere, in-the-moment self. Please join us at the Kick-Off Event for the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists (aka The Davey Foundation) on December 17 at the Tower Theatre – click here for more information and to purchase tickets (only $10!) to that event as well as information on Plan-B’s open call for scripts for playwrights ages 35 and younger (deadline January 31,...

Directors Cheryl Ann Cluff and Kay Shean reflect on working with actor David Fetzer

David Fetzer created the role of Everett Ruess in Debora Threedy’s THE END OF THE HORIZON in 2008, directed by Kay Shean and the role of Arthur Dimmesdale in Jenifer Nii’s adaption of THE SCARLET LETTER in 2012, his final stage role, directed by Cheryl Ann Cluff.  David passed away in December of 2012.  His family has established the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists, aka The Davey Foundation, to ensure that David’s love of music, film and theatre lives on. Kay Shean, Director, THE END OF THE HORIZON:  David Fetzer was the kind of actor every director dreams of finding. He was special. He was unique and amazingly talented. Genuine to the core, it showed in every move he made and every word he spoke both on and off the stage. Before we started rehearsals for “The End of the Horizon,” some of the cast members, the playwright, Debora Threedy and I took a road trip to the red rock area of Southern Utah to experience places Everett Ruess loved and where he disappeared. I held my breath as David leapt from ledge to ledge, scampered up close to sheer cliffs and stood statue-still, soaking in the reality of the place, letting it fuse into the Everett he was going to create. In rehearsal, he brought all of that and much more. In performance, he was magic. At one point during rehearsals, a cast member told me when you were in a scene with David, he was so there, it pulled everything to another level. I watched this happen time and time again. That was David. His...

Playwright Debora Threedy reflects on working with actor David Fetzer

David Fetzer created the role of Everett Reuss in Debora Threedy’s play THE END OF THE HORIZON in 2008 (for which he won a special Arty Award from Salt Lake City Weekly) and a string of roles in her play THE THIRD CROSSING in 2012.  David passed away in December of 2012.  His family has established the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists, aka The Davey Foundation, to ensure that David’s love of music, film and theatre lives on.  Side note: by day, Debora Threedy is a law professor at the University of Utah, where she taught David’s mother Betsy who would, on occasion, bring little Davey to class with her. David wasn’t the first actor cast as Everett in my play THE END OF THE HORIZON, based on the mysterious disappearance of Everett Ruess in southern Utah in 1934. Kay Shean, the director, had initially cast another actor, who then had to bow out several months before rehearsals started. Jerry Rapier came to me and said he’d found out that David Fetzer was back in town and what did I think about him as Everett? Needless to say, I thought it was a good idea. Looking back now, I can’t imagine anyone else playing the part. David embodied perfectly the essence of Everett’s fierce determination to live the life he wanted, regardless of what anyone else thought. Moreover, David – who was himself talented in so many creative fields – also brought to life Everett’s artistic side. Literally. As a closing night gift, he gave each of us a woodcut based on Dorothea Lange’s iconic photographs of...

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