Betsy Ross remembers her son David Fetzer

Please click here to read Betsy Ross’ cover article in the December 11, 2013 edition of Salt Lake City Weekly about her son David Fetzer. Please join us at the Kick-Off Event for the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists (aka The Davey Foundation) on December 17 at the Tower Theatre – click here for more information and to purchase tickets (only $10!) to that event as well as information on Plan-B’s open call for scripts for playwrights ages 35 and younger (deadline January 31,...

Actor Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin remembers working with David Fetzer

Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin appeared with our dear, departed friend David Fetzer in Plan-B’s world premiere of Debora Threedy’s THE THIRD CROSSING in 2012. David was enigmatic and charming and one of the funniest people I have ever known. Truth be told, off the stage he was a well-loved and adored goofball. He had a wicked sense of humor that was so quick. What I remember most is his laughter and his doodles. He was gracious, accepting gum or a mint before every stage kiss without a beat. On stage, he was just as charismatic and lovely. His actor choices were bold and nuanced. He made you feel something with every character he embodied. He was a gifted actor, and you automatically wanted to be better when you played opposite him. I am so glad I had the opportunity to work with him. Please join us at the Kick-Off Event for the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists (aka The Davey Foundation) on December 17 at the Tower Theatre – click here for more information and to purchase tickets (only $10!) to that event as well as information on Plan-B’s open call for scripts for playwrights ages 35 and younger (deadline January 31,...

Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin on WTF and SLAM

Dee-Dee Darby-Duffin appeared in THE THIRD CROSSING earlier this season for Plan-B Theatre Company.  This is her first SLAM. I know that I may seem on the surface like this off-the-wall, kooky , fly–by-the-seat-of-my-pants kind of girl; but the reality is, I like to have, at the very least some preemptive knowledge about WTF I’m getting myself into before just jumping in. This SLAM thing is like a trip to the dentist. You’re scared to death to go but you know that your teeth are going to be pearly white when you are done.  You have to get numb but you know its going to wear off. I have a confession. I am a SLAM virgin. I KNOW! I can hardly believe it myself but there you go! Having never done SLAM or even seen SLAM I can only speculate what it will be like for me. I have heard about it from plenty of other actors and, I have to say, the idea of working with a director who has just been given a script (albeit a 10-minute play) and having to have actors learn the lines, blocking and deliver a meaningful interpretation is not my idea of a rollin the hay but I’m willing to try anything – once! What’s more, compared to other really funny people, I honestly I don’t think I am that funny.  Don’t get it twisted I am in no way self-deprecating, but I know my strengths. I am not even good at this blog writing thing because I ask myself “Who gives a rat’s ass what I have to say about a process I...

David Fetzer on switching gears from (1) film to stage acting and (2) THE THIRD CROSSING to THE SCARLET LETTER

Prior to THE SCARLET LETTER, David Fetzer appeared in Plan-B’s THE END OF THE HORIZON, SCRIPT-IN-HAND SERIES and THE THIRD CROSSING. I’m currently undergoing a Plan-B theatrical boot camp.  For the past two years I’ve been doing more film acting than stage acting.  I developed a lot of bad habits.  The nature of film acting basically requires that you embrace everything that you should NOT do on stage.  With a camera and good sound equipment, you can get away with poor diction, speaking quietly, learning your lines the day of the shoot, etc.  So for the past little while I’ve pretty much been defamiliarizing myself with all of my theatrical instincts and sensibilities.  And here I find myself in my second play in two months, playing Arthur Dimmesdale, a proper-English-speaking fellow from 17th century New England – an eloquent minister, to boot. I struggled with excising most of my film acting habits while performing in Plan-B’s THE THIRD CROSSING, which closed a couple of days before THE SCARLET LETTER‘s first rehearsal. It really hadn’t been that long since my last theatrical performance, and yet I’d already fallen out of the habit of enunciating and projecting, and the concept of learning my lines “word-perfectly” was comically abstract.  One of my worst acting habits is paraphrasing.  But when you’re dealing with world premieres, which Plan-B specializes in, there is an added obligation to honor every word, ellipsis, every “um” and “uh, well” that the playwright has written. I was expecting the vernacular of THE THIRD CROSSING to be easier and more approachable from a memorization standpoint, because it was mostly contemporary...

Audience reactions to THE THIRD CROSSING

THE THIRD CROSSING is sold out.  Click here for information on Jenifer Nii’s adaptation of THE SCARLET LETTER, running April 12-22, 2012.   The collaboration between directing and writing in Plan-B’s THE THIRD CROSSING is insatiable. Playwright Debora Threedy brilliantly paints a poignant picture of how racial assimilation bleeds into our cultural and sociological psyche.  This is a significant piece that should be handled with care in the most humble sense.  Director Jerry Rapier’s pacing and exquisite sense of casting provides the audience with an exceptional night of theater that should not be taken for granted! Michelle Patrick, Artistic Director, People Productions   Storytelling at its best. Bonnie Walsh   THE THIRD CROSSING was at once funny, angering, confounding, inspirational and frightening.  Thank you. Janice Gully   I was angry, inspired, moved and educated. In other words: a great play. Alex Grey   Debora Threedy’s THE THIRD CROSSING is a thought-provoking work that probes the nature of human relations against the backdrop of the inhumanity of the institution of slavery.  It employs the enigmatic life and legacy of Sally Hemings, a slave woman owned by President Thomas Jefferson, as an invitation to the viewer to interrogate relationships, race, color and racism. Threedy captures the complexity of crossing the color line and intermixing where the condition of unfreedom constrains choices, yet opens possibilities for Sally and her mixed-race descendants – the children she bore for Jefferson. As the play alternates between the past and various points of forward progress for race relations and mixed-race relationships, it introduces other interconnections and lays bare the harm bias inflicts on humanity and the...

Deena Marie Manzanares on true ensemble work in THE THIRD CROSSING

Prior to THE THIRD CROSSING, Deena Marie Manzanares has previously appeared in AMERIGO, SLAM and A DOLL HOUSE (Script-In-Hand Series) for Plan-B Theatre Company. Perhaps the biggest appeal of the acting profession to me is that it is never-ending and never the same.  Every experience is unique, every experience temporary.  You hope to do it all, and eventually you’ll get to.  It is always new.  It is always surprising. THE THIRD CROSSING is staged in a particularly exciting convention, one I haven’t been part of before.  When you hear people use the term “ensemble piece,” this is what they’re talking about. The cast never leaves the stage.  We perform our scenes and change our costume pieces with the audience and each other looking on.  A bell dings when the scene is over and the next one is up.  It’s a heightened sense of give and take.  Of taking turns.  There is something different and exciting about watching each other and being visible to the audience when in character and when out. But everything must be super-focused for this to work effectively.  There is an extra charge of electricity knowing your cast is literally surrounding you and supporting you at all times.  There is evena greater sense of being part of the whole, sharing the experience of THE THIRD CROSSING, in this way from beginning to end. There’s a jolt of excitement every time the bell dings.  One minute we’re glimpsing the world of Thomas Jeffereson and Sally Hemings.  The next it’s a modern-day, interracial couple sharing both the fears they face, but also the hope they have that they wouldn’t have had...

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