PREPARING FOR THE UTAH TOUR OF EXPOSED

KIRT BATEMAN, ACTOR
I’m honored to be part of EXPOSED. But it means more to me now that it did last year. I am – as this tour commences -losing my mother-in-law to cancer caused by exposure from our government’s mighty show of nuclear strength. Another light going out…this one too close to home. As one government official put it so many years ago when justifying the tests: “[these people] are a low-use segment of the population.” Well, that’s my partner’s mother, my friend’s father, our playwright’s sister, and YOU he’s referring to.

JOYCE COHEN, ACTOR
I am so pleased to have an opportunity to present this play again. It’s my fervent wish that it will continue to be seen and heard and, schedule permitting, that I may continue to be a part of it. It is so important that the power of this play be experienced.

TERI COWAN, ACTOR
My delusional self was thinking that picking up EXPOSED was kind of going to be a breeze. However, now that I’ve spent some time back in the script, I’m remembering all the non-verbals, the action worked around a prop and the body language that spoke volumes. Wondering how we’ll re-create all of that in a “reading” performance. Thankfully, I trust our director to remedy those issues.

MARY DICKSON, PLAYWRIGHT
I can’t believe it’s been a year since the premiere of EXPOSED! It’s thrilling to be able to take it around the state with the original cast and bring this important story to new audiences. It’s our story as Utahns and as Americans. Plus, I can’t wait to spend time with this incredible cast again. We share a great bond.

MARK FOSSEN, ACTOR
My thoughts on revisiting EXPOSED a year after its premiere? In no particular order: “Can’t wait to see everyone,” “I need to remember how I did that voice,” “It’s awesome to take this to the affected communities that can’t come to Salt Lake,” and “I hope I still fit into my costume.” Theatre’s so ephemeral that it’s a rare treat to come back a year later to do a tour like this. I’m looking forward to every minute of it.

JENNIFER FREED, STAGE MANAGER
I can’t say I am surprised we are continuing our journey with EXPOSED. From the moment I first read this play I knew it would go on. Taking the play to some of the towns closest to the testing site is a natural progression. I look forward to seeing how the life of this play will continue to grow.

JERRY RAPIER, DIRECTOR
My natural mother was outdoors in Nagasaki when the bomb fell. My adoptive mother is currently losing her battle with lung and bone cancer. She grew up in Overgaard, Arizona which, according to the U.S. government, was the region in Arizona hardest hit by nuclear fallout in the 1950s. In fact, she lived there each of the six years in that decade that were identified as the highest risk. She is a downwinder. When I started working with Mary on this play nearly two years ago, it spoke to me on a gut level that I did not understand. Now I do – this issue is my issue.

TERESA SANDERSON, ACTOR
I can’t wait to hang out with everybody again, this cast really feels like family to me so it will be a blast to go on a big old road trip. I also look forward to giving these characters a voice once more – they are passionate people and I can’t wait to share their stories again.

JASON TATOM, ACTOR
It’s strange to think it’s been an entire year since the run. I’m excited that new audiences are going to be able to see and be affected by Mary’s play – especially those in southern Utah, places hard hit by the testing, still dealing with the effects today. But I’m most excited to be working with the people again. It’s like seeing family again after a long time apart (and without any pesky familial issues to deal with). I’m ready to get started.

BLOCK 8 - Jerry Rapier
RADIO HOUR: FRANKENSTEIN - Sam Mollner

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