Waitlist info for …OF COLOR

…OF COLOR is sold out but you can still see the show! WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27 Click here for details on this Benefit Preview Performance for Racially Just Utah. REGULAR PERFORMANCES MARCH 28-APRIL 7 Any tickets that come available will be listed here. Otherwise, a pre-paid waitlist will form in the box office one hour before show time. You must be there, in person, to get on the wait list. Then check back five minutes before show time. As many waitlisters as possible will be seated at show time. Those we can’t seat will receive a full refund. We’ve never had a sold-out performance where at least two waitlisters weren’t seated. Th & F @ 8pm, Sat @ 4pm & 8pm, Sun @...

Board president Rebecca Chavez-Houck on …OF COLOR

Former Utah State Representative Rebecca Chavez-Houck is Plan-B’s current board president. One of the things I love most about Plan-B Theatre is our willingness to tackle difficult subjects head on. And the uniquely Utah experience we intentionally incorporate into our work provides a much needed overlay to explore the good and bad in our collective lives. Bringing …OF COLOR to life is one of those experiences. The four short works featured in this production are a wonderfully organic result of a Theatre Artists of Color gathering that we at Plan-B initiated a couple of years ago. A few of the 51 artists involved in that discussion mentioned that they wanted to expand their experience in writing plays but didn’t know quite where to start. We facilitated that opportunity. These stories are our voices, our experiences as people of color in today’s Utah – you might feel slightly uncomfortable, slightly out of place as you experience them. That’s intentional – we invite you to be immersed in some of the day-to-day situations that are sadly commonplace for many of us. We’ll also provide a healthy dose of belly laughs. Use what you see, what you hear, to enlighten yourself as well as those around you. Seek understanding. Seek change. …OF COLOR (comprised of “American Pride” by Iris Salazar, “The Frailest Thing” by Bijan Hosseini, “Drivers License, Please” by Olivia Custodio and “Roar” by Darryl Stamp) premieres March 28-April 7. Limited tickets available...

Why …OF COLOR?

Jerry Rapier has been Artistic Director of Plan-B Theatre Company since 2000. He directs …OF COLOR, premiering Mach 28-April 7, 2019 his thirty-third full production for the company, not counting myriad Script-In-Hand Series readings, revivals and 10-minute plays. The following also appears in the March 2019 issue of Catalyst Magazine. “Life is learning to hold paradox.” – from “The Frailest Thing” by Bijan Hosseini If I hear one more person say “I don’t see color” I might lose my mind. Why? Because it’s not true. It’s just a thing people say when they want other people to see them as progressive. Let me rephrase that: It’s a thing white people say when they want people of color to see them as progressive. You will never hear a person of color use that phrase. Because it’s not true. Nor should it be. What matters is what you do with what you see. Think “color conscious” not “color blind.” I will tell you right now that when I enter a room, the first thing I do – I have always done – is scan the room and take a headcount of the other people of color. Every room. Every time. Why? https://planbtheatre.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Puppet.mp4   Because I feel a pressure to act differently if I am the only non-white person in the room. And I have yet to talk to another person of color who does not do the same thing. Call it POC-GPS. If there’s more than one of us, we intuitively split The Load of Representation, aka The Expectation of White People That People Of Color Represent Their Entire Race And, In...

Mexican playwright Iris Salazar on creating “American Pride” for …OF COLOR

Playwright Iris Salazar was born in Gomez, Palacios, Durango, Mexico. She has lived in Salt Lake City since she was eight months old and became a citizen in 2000. A member of Plan-B’s Theatre Artists of Color Writing Workshop, she makes her playwriting debut this season with a very, very dark comedy about making America great again: “American Pride” is one of four short plays that comprise …OF COLOR, premiering in March of 2019. I knew when I signed up for the Theatre Artists of Color Writing Workshop that I wanted to write a piece that reflected my political thoughts. I am not a politician, and I have never been able to articulate or debate politics in any way. I went through a torrent of emotions as I watched Donald Trump attack groups of people and brag about his sexual predatory behavior during his campaign but I naively believed that we would never allow this man to preside over our country. My disappointment, anger, and sadness were far too large to measure and simply get over as some would suggest. I found myself posting everything anti-Trump that I could post on social media. In the process, I discovered that people who I knew, went to church with and even admired were supportive and defensive of this individual. One day I saw a picture of an acquaintance on social media standing next to Mike Pence. She is an educated, well-to-do and respected Christian Lady. She studied politics, is in-the-know when it comes to political policies and she is persuasive. That picture was the beginning of my short play. As a person of color, I didn’t think I could write...

Persian/Japanese playwright Bijan Hosseini on creating “The Frailest Thing” for …OF COLOR

Persian/Japanese playwright Bijan Hosseini has previously appeared in Plan-B’s (IN)DIVISIBLE. A member of Plan-B’s Theatre Artists of Color Writing Workshop, he makes his playwriting debut this season with a drama about the difference between wanting to live and not wanting to die: “The Frailest Thing” is one of four short plays that comprise …OF COLOR, premiering in March of 2019. I have no idea what I’m doing. Several people much smarter than me who do have all told me that this is okay. I [almost] believe them, intellectually. Emotionally … not so much. – Not yet anyway. This experience has been a thing, like a gun to my head that graciously forced me to do the thing I want to do but haven’t often done – write. And in writing I’ve been led through a process that bled me open and made me look at other processes inside: What’s in my control and what’s not? What do I want to hang on to, and what do I need? What can I let go of, and what can’t I? What do I have to let go of, and how long do I have to be dragged before I finally let go? I still don’t know. I don’t have any answers. – Not yet anyway. The play, for me; roots this universal existential angst about which one can become mired in intellectualization and puts it into a painful present with very little, if any, control – it puts the gun to the head and forces the reality not of thoughts, but feeling. Thank you Jerry for holding the gun, Julie for loading it, Plan-B et...

Latina playwright Olivia Custodio on creating “Drivers License, Please” for …OF COLOR

Latina playwright Olivia Custodio is a member of Plan-B’s Theatre Artists of Color Writing Workshop. She makes her playwriting debut this season with a dark comedy about bagels, rental cars and rednecks: “Drivers License, Please” is one of four short plays that comprise …OF COLOR, premiering in March of 2019. Writing a play is weird. Seriously weird. As an actor, I usually feel pretty confident when I walk out onto a stage and give a performance. But watching my play onstage?! Welcome to Insecurityville, population: me! It is a very strange thing to write words from your heart and know that people are going to hear them. It’s as though someone else gets to read your diary to a crowd and you have zero power to control how it goes. Personally, I think writing a play is far scarier than being an actor. I still can’t even use the word ‘playwright’ to describe myself. Writing “Drivers License, Please” has taught me a lot about myself, which isn’t something that I necessarily thought would happen during the process of creating a one-act play. It has taught me that yes, I do actually know what I’m doing and I have to trust it. I have to be okay with the fact that it will never be perfect and sometimes, as Julie Jensen says, you need to “just write the damn thing!” That other opinions matter, but ultimately I get to tell my story the way I want to. Sure, it may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but neither was the awkward and crunchy afro that I sported freshman year of college, and hey, I survived...

Pin It on Pinterest