“Plan-B produces full seasons of new plays by local playwrights. No one else in the country does that!”
Gary Garrison, Executive Director, Creative Affairs, Dramatists Guild of America

Founded in 2008 and funded in part by the the B.W. Bastian Foundation, The Lab is an incubator for new plays, an opportunity for each of the 11 member playwrights (Matthew Ivan Bennett, Rachel BublitzElaine Jarvik, Julie Jensen, Jenny Kokai, Melissa Leilani Larson, Jenifer Nii, Eric Samuelsen, Morag Shepherd and Debora Threedy) to share whatever script they wish, at whatever stage they wish, in a private table reading for the group.

The ultimate goal is two-fold: (1) to continually contribute to the field nationally by strengthening a local community of playwrights and (2) to populate future seasons as often as possible with their work. The Lab is truly an innovative artist community.

The Lab makes it possible for us to build relationships with playwrights rather than plays. Read more from the playwrights in this Utah Theatre Bloggers Association feature, in the anthologies Plan-B has published and on the Plan-B Blog. Special thanks to dramaturgs Martine Kei Green-Rogers, Janine Sobeck Knighton, Greg Hatch and Sydney Cheek-O’Donnell for their guidance and insight.

Click here for the full history of plays read in The Lab and history of first productions.

Click here for the full history of plays read in the Script-In-Hand Series, many of which are by current members or alums of The Lab.

Alums (2008-2012): John Belliston Beth Bruner, Carleton Bluford, Megan Crivello, Debora DeVos, Isabella Iasella, Jim Martin, Kyle Nelson and Lucy Ridolphi.

Alums (2012-present): Austin Archer, Carleton Bluford and Rob Tennant.

Jenny Kokai on her play THE ART OF FLOATING

So some parts of this play are very true, some parts are very false, and some parts lie somewhere in between. Most of the things I won’t confess to, but here are a couple. The first is that I think everybody is still trying to figure stuff out, whether you’re 75 or 21. We think we’re supposed to get old and wise but I don’t think that ever happens.

Matthew Ivan Bennett on RADIO HOUR EPISODE 11: YULETIDE

I’m so, so grateful that I get to do as much theatre as I do. RADIO HOUR EPISODE 11: YULETIDE feels like an early Christmas present — one that I really, really “need.” Writing for radio is especially rewarding because . . . something about it connects me to that little kid who hid in the coat closet with a microphone. There’s a more intimate overlap, I think, between playing make-believe and grown-up, big-people theatre than we thespians like to admit.

Matthew Ivan Bennett on his play WHAT WE HAD TO

See, the Stasi thrived through a network of paid or blackmailed informants. “They” were largely made up of regular men and women. “They” were not always in uniforms. “They” were your brothers, mothers, co-workers, college professors, and favorite uncles. “They” were like you, and “They” were not necessarily after an obvious out-group. And, as I explore in my play, “They” might have been as afraid of their bosses as anyone else.

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